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your safety’s at stake!!! The Federal Trade Commission’s tips for socializing safely online
October 14, 2009, 4:01 am
Filed under: Identity Theft | Tags: , , , , ,

image from Don Hankins on flickr

 Federal commissions tips to being safe on the internet :

1) “Think about how different sites work before deciding to join a site. Some sites will allow only a defined community of users to access posted content; others allow anyone and everyone to view postings.

2)Think about keeping some control over the information you post. Consider restricting access to your page to a select group of people, for example, your friends from school, your club, your team, your community groups, or your family.

3) Keep your information to yourself. Don’t post your full name, Social Security number, address, phone number, or bank and credit card account numbers — and don’t post other people’s information, either. Be cautious about posting information that could be used to identify you or locate you offline. This could include the name of your school, sports team, clubs, and where you work or hang out.

4) Make sure your screen name doesn’t say too much about you. Don’t use your name, your age, or your hometown. Even if you think your screen name makes you anonymous, it doesn’t take a genius to combine clues to figure out who you are and where you can be found.

5)Post only information that you are comfortable with others seeing — and knowing — about you. Many people can see your page, including your parents, your teachers, the police, the college you might want to apply to next year, or the job you might want to apply for in five years.

6)Remember that once you post information online, you can’t take it back. Even if you delete the information from a site, older versions exist on other people’s computers.

7)Consider not posting your photo. It can be altered and broadcast in ways you may not be happy about. If you do post one, ask yourself whether it’s one your mom would display in the living room.Flirting with strangers online could have serious consequences. Because some people lie about who they really are, you never really know who you’re dealing with.

8)Be wary if a new online friend wants to meet you in person. Before you decide to meet someone, do your research: Ask whether any of your friends know the person, and see what background you can dig up through online search engines. If you decide to meet them, be smart about it: Meet in a public place, during the day, with friends you trust. Tell an adult or a responsible sibling where you’re going, and when you expect to be back.

9) Trust your gut if you have suspicions. If you feel threatened by someone or uncomfortable because of something online, tell an adult you trust and report it to the police and the social networking site. You could end up preventing someone else from becoming a victim”.

After reading these key saftey points i realised that i dont follow nearlly half of them, until studying this topic I havent before realised the extreme danger when it comes to the online world. I dont think many users who have a facebook site would actually know the hidden dangers either. Do you or have you ever thought about this??

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Social Networking Risks: How safe are you??
October 14, 2009, 3:50 am
Filed under: Identity Theft | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Image from Don Hankins on flickr

“Last month, officials from the government gave out a general warning that criminals might be taking a keen interest in what you leave behind in social networking sites. They were pointedly referring to the unbridled popularity of social networking and to the dangers social networking might expose users to”.

“Criminals, they warn, might be looking to test the territory of social websites to enact crimes like pedophilia and phishing scams. The danger of identity theft in social networks was particularly highlighted as swindlers can use bits and pieces of information posted online by users to steal their identity. The warning should bring the spotlight on the loopholes in social networking security and how users can avert dangers arising out of them”.

Fraud and scam news – http://www.419legal.org/blog/2008/04/09/social-networking-risks-how-safe-are-you-with-revealing-personal-information-in-social-networking-sites/

After much research into this topic I myself am feeling unsure about my safety in regards to identity theft. This particular issue has grown much more over the past year and many believe it is going to get much worse. Face book seems to most users a way to keep in touch with friends, share images and up date your every day activities but what many users don’t think about is their personal safety when using social networking sites like face book.



Perceptions of privacy and ownership
October 7, 2009, 4:26 am
Filed under: images | Tags: , , , ,

Andrew Besmer’s article, Privacy Perceptions of Photo Sharing in Facebook, discusses concerns facebook users have with photosharing. Primarily these concerns related to privacy and ownership. Participants in the study were less concerned with strangers acessing unflattering pictures of them, than they were with certain members of their established network. For instance, people were more scared of family members finding picture of them drunk. Besmer suggests that people are more concerned with identity shaping than in personal security. The issue of ownership was widely acknowledged by participants. However, the perception was that either the person who posted the photograph was either the owner or the co-owner. In reality facebook currently claims ownership over IP material insofar as facebook is able to use uploaded material for any purpose they deem fit. “You grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook.” Web2.0 allows more equal access to publishing, but it also causes great conflict over ownership and use of content. What this study shows is that many people are not entirely aware what they have agreed to when they sign up for a facebook account.