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Facebook Safety Tips

5 Facebook Safety Tips by identity theft expert john sileo

Facebook Safety Tip #1: If they’re not your friend, don’t pretend. Don’t accept friend requests unless you absolutely know who they are and that you would associate with them in person, just like real friends.

Facebook Safety Tip #2: Post only what you want made public. Be cautious about the personal information that you post on any social media site, as there is every chance in the world that it will spread beyond your original submission.  It may be fun to think that an old flame can contact you, but now scammers and thieves are clambering to access that personal information as well.

Facebook Safety Tip #3: Manage your privacy settings. Sixty percent of social network users are unaware of their default privacy settings. Facebook actually does a good job of explaining how to lock your privacy down (even if they don’t set up your account with good privacy settings by default). To make it easy for you, follow these steps:

  1. Spend 10 minutes reading the Facebook Privacy Policy. This is an education in social networking privacy issues. Once you have read through a privacy policy, you will never view your private information in the same way. At the point the privacy policy is putting you to sleep, move on to Step 2.
  2. Visit the Facebook Privacy Help Page. This explains how to minimize all of the possible personal information leakage that you just read about in the privacy policy. Once you understand this on one social networking site, it becomes second nature on most of the others. 
  3. Now it is time to customize your Facebook Privacy Settings so that only information you want shared, IS shared. This simple step will reduce your risk of identity theft dramatically.

Facebook Safety Tip #4: Keep Google Out. Unless you want all of your personal information indexed by Google and other search engines, restrict your profile so that it is not visible to these data-mining experts.

Facebook Safety Tip #5: Don’t unthinkingly respond to Friends in Distress. If you receive a post requesting money to help a friend out, do the smart thing and call them in person. Friend in Distress schemes are when a thief takes over someone else’s account and then makes a plea for financial help to all of your friends (who think that the post is coming from you). As with all matters of identity, verify the source.

This content from: http://www.sileo.com/facebook-safety/#more-554

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Collage students 27% more likely to get identity stolen online!!!
October 27, 2009, 6:08 am
Filed under: Identity Theft | Tags: , , , ,

Lockergnome.com believes that collage students are 27% more likely to get their identity stolen trough online social networking sites. With the increased use of global media more and more people are facing issues of identity theft, what if this happened to you? What if a hacker stole your name and used it for their own ammusment? These are just some questions I have been thinking about latley whilst researching this topic. Society dosn’t believe this will ever happen to them thats its just another technological worry…. But what if???

http://www.lockergnome.com/kentlewis/2008/11/29/how-social-media-networks-facilitate-identity-theft-and-online-fraud/



Flickr
October 27, 2009, 3:16 am
Filed under: images | Tags: , , , , ,

I haven’t really looked at flickr much in terms of the way it functions as a social network in itself. As far as sharing images goes, flickr seems like the place that more serious photographers and image makers go. This is probably due to issues of ownership that arise with sharing images on facebook. Although a few people I know share paintings, drawings and their own professional photography on facebook, most of the images I come across are more personal amateur pieces. Flickr provides a completely image based community, but further than that, it assures users that content will remain theirs after it is uploaded. Flickr has its own commons and supports creative commons by allowing searches of creative commons licensed content.

Flickr demonstrates complex layers of categorisation. Images can be tagged and can be added to groups, sets, galleries or favorites. You can add notes or comments. You can join groups and add contacts. Flickr offers a folksonomy which is even more subjective and variable, because it offers many way in which an image can be labeled. Not only do you make a subjective decision in deciding what tags to use, but you make subjective decisions in how images are grouped and so, in how they are seen. Many of the images on flickr are just as everyday or just as insignificant to traditional modes of history as those on facebook. However, flickr shows a different way of aggregating material, which focuses possibly even less on who, where, when and much more specifically on what. On flickr communities can document their activities, aggregating information, which may be valuable to future members of these communities. Although the personal histories of flickr users may not have value to greater society at present, there is no way of knowing what value they may have in future.

image from h.koppdelaney on flickr



Privacy and social networks – video generated by the office of the privacy commission of canada
October 26, 2009, 12:15 pm
Filed under: Identity Theft | Tags: , , , , , , ,


What does a friend of a friend of a friend know about you???

[disclaimer: we do not claim copyright over this material]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X7gWEgHeXcA



Those without Social Network Profiles Could Have Online Identities Stolen
October 26, 2009, 11:49 am
Filed under: Identity Theft | Tags: , , , , ,

Security firm Aladdin in their annual threat report believe a new lot of identity thieves are coming after individual personal web profiles. According to the firm, if you don’t own and control your online persona, it’s relatively easy for a criminal to aggregate the known public information about you in order to create a fake one.

“This new type of identity theft was listed among other predictions for 2009 in the firm’s annual report and was based on previous trends which included a rise in attacks distributed through social networking channels. For example, in 2008, we saw worm writers (like those behind Koobface) taking advantage of the growing popularity of social networks as a means of distributing their worms. As these sites continue to grow, the potential for criminal activity surrounding them will grow as well”.

According to Ian Amit, director of research at Aladdin’s Attack Intelligence Research Centre, the potential damage for this new type of identity theft will be “devastating, both on the personal level by creating difficulties in employment, ruining social and professional connections, damaging reputations; as well as on a financial level, such as stealing customers and corporate data.

To test their predictions this particular team were able to set up fake online identities, which they believe connected to their real network of friends and aquaintences easily. The thought of identity hikacking has personally really scared me, there is so much information online especially in todays society about each and every individual that in the wrong hands could be used against you. It is seen to be a problem that is increasing over time, each day a large amount of information is generated through the internet imagine what could be found after all these years? should we as a society be worried? well i personally am!

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/fake_social_network_profiles_a.php



Hyper Advertising

For regular users of the internet, banner ads and pop up ads are just part of everyday use. Usually we close them without a second thought or simply ignore them, however, occasionally one will catch our eye and we will explore what it has to offer.

For those of us who use social networking sites, it should be no surprise that some of the ads appeal and target us better than most of the ads we are bombarded with during general browsing. Targeted advertising is not a new concept, it’s the same reason ads for kids toys come on during Bob the Builder, home makers see ads for cleaning products during Sunrise and the Kerry Anne Show and why funeral insurance is shown to the aging people watching the history channel!

What makes the advertising on your Facebook and MySpace profile more accurate (and in a sense more creepy) is generally how accurate it is. Social networking sites hold large amounts of personal information about you. They know in-depth information like age, marital status, favourite movies, books, pastimes and other products that you’re a fan of and as a result they are obviously able to target you with more appropriate marketing.

As an excellent example I have identified from my personal use is that I always see advertisements for the ‘fastest way to get fit’ ‘put on 10lb of muscle’ ‘MMA Workout secrets’ etc when I log on to Facebook. I know other male friends of the same age get similar ads and female friends get similar ads targeting stomach fat, but not building muscle. This demonstrates that Facebook is using gender specific targeting advertising.

Social networking sites like Facebook and MySpace are designed to make money. They survive off ad revenue and if you read your terms of service when you sign up (who does that though really?) you’ll see that they can do a lot with your information. Advertising on many websites, including social networking sites, works of payment in Cost per Click (CPC) or Clicks per Mille (CPM). Regardless of the term used, the bottom line is if the marketers don’t get people clicking on the ads the person advertising doesn’t pay. Therefore it is in the interest of the marketer to make the advertising as personalised and relevant to the internet user as possible in order to increase clicks.



your safety’s at stake!!! The Federal Trade Commission’s tips for socializing safely online
October 14, 2009, 4:01 am
Filed under: Identity Theft | Tags: , , , , ,

image from Don Hankins on flickr

 Federal commissions tips to being safe on the internet :

1) “Think about how different sites work before deciding to join a site. Some sites will allow only a defined community of users to access posted content; others allow anyone and everyone to view postings.

2)Think about keeping some control over the information you post. Consider restricting access to your page to a select group of people, for example, your friends from school, your club, your team, your community groups, or your family.

3) Keep your information to yourself. Don’t post your full name, Social Security number, address, phone number, or bank and credit card account numbers — and don’t post other people’s information, either. Be cautious about posting information that could be used to identify you or locate you offline. This could include the name of your school, sports team, clubs, and where you work or hang out.

4) Make sure your screen name doesn’t say too much about you. Don’t use your name, your age, or your hometown. Even if you think your screen name makes you anonymous, it doesn’t take a genius to combine clues to figure out who you are and where you can be found.

5)Post only information that you are comfortable with others seeing — and knowing — about you. Many people can see your page, including your parents, your teachers, the police, the college you might want to apply to next year, or the job you might want to apply for in five years.

6)Remember that once you post information online, you can’t take it back. Even if you delete the information from a site, older versions exist on other people’s computers.

7)Consider not posting your photo. It can be altered and broadcast in ways you may not be happy about. If you do post one, ask yourself whether it’s one your mom would display in the living room.Flirting with strangers online could have serious consequences. Because some people lie about who they really are, you never really know who you’re dealing with.

8)Be wary if a new online friend wants to meet you in person. Before you decide to meet someone, do your research: Ask whether any of your friends know the person, and see what background you can dig up through online search engines. If you decide to meet them, be smart about it: Meet in a public place, during the day, with friends you trust. Tell an adult or a responsible sibling where you’re going, and when you expect to be back.

9) Trust your gut if you have suspicions. If you feel threatened by someone or uncomfortable because of something online, tell an adult you trust and report it to the police and the social networking site. You could end up preventing someone else from becoming a victim”.

After reading these key saftey points i realised that i dont follow nearlly half of them, until studying this topic I havent before realised the extreme danger when it comes to the online world. I dont think many users who have a facebook site would actually know the hidden dangers either. Do you or have you ever thought about this??